Attack In The High School Girls’ Restroom

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

Robin Lyons' Blog Post #118Social media, electronic devices, and constant contact have become a necessity to many. To those who aren’t addicted or dependent on social media and their electronic devices, the allure is baffling.

In the recent news, a 17-year-old girl was on trial and found guilty of involuntary manslaughter for encouraging her boyfriend to commit suicide—all through texting.

The amazing, lightning-speed internet can be a blessing and a curse. Parents should regularly monitor what their children are doing and saying on the internet.

BLOG POST #118: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific criminal case involving four high school girls.

Everyone Watched—Nobody Helped

Three teenage girls left the high school cafeteria in search of another who presumably had posted something on social media that angered the girls on the hunt.

The three girls found who they were looking for in a school restroom. One of the angry teens posted a photo on social media and wrote “bouta fight her,” followed by several emojis indicating the person was laughing so hard she was crying.

The victim was punched numerous times by one assailant and kicked by another. The third attempted to pull the primary aggressor away from the victim.

Electronic Evidence

Dozens of girls watched the fight, and at least two recorded parts of it with their cell phones.

It seems cruel for anyone to have recorded the fight. Turned out to be a good thing, the recordings were used as evidence in the case. Plausible deniability goes out the window when there’s a video of the crime.

However, it is disheartening that nobody tried to stop the fight or help the victim.

When A Fight Turned Deadly

Unbeknownst to the three aggressors, the victim had a pre-existing heart condition. Her heart couldn’t handle the level of stress associated with her attack, and she did not survive.

The Medical Examiner determined that she died from a cardiac incident that she was vulnerable to because of a pre-existing heart condition, but the cardiac incident would not have occurred if she had not been assaulted.

Consequence Of The Unlawful Act

The primary aggressor was charged with Criminally Negligent Homicide and Conspiracy 3rd Degree in the death of the classmate. The two other girls were charged with Conspiracy 3rd Degree. All cases remained in juvenile court.

For there to be Criminally Negligent Homicide, the death must be the natural and probable consequence of the unlawful act and not the result of intervening causes.

The defense argued a reasonable person of the Respondent’s age and experience would not expect injury much less death to result from a fight. The judge disagreed and found her guilty on both counts.

The judge found one of the other two girls guilty of Conspiracy 3rd Degree.

The judge said, “While it may be true that [the victim], due to her condition would have died from a multitude of stressors, until such an event occurred, if at all, she had a right to live one more day, one more week, one more month or year, until her time, without a contributing cause of another.”

The judge also said this was not a fight between two teenagers squaring off to settle some mutual grievance, but rather, an act of violence initiated and carried out by the Respondent over a perceived slight on social media.

The judge sentenced the primary aggressor to six months in a secure residential program for female youths. She was banned from social media, community supervision until she’s 19, and ordered to perform 500 hours of community service with an emphasis on serving young people who have been abused or bullied.

The girl who kicked the victim was sentenced to 18 months of community supervision and 300 hours of community service.

My heart goes out to all families who have suffered because of a school crime. And my sincere condolences go to those who have lost a loved one.

What do you think about this case? Do you know of a school crime you’d like to share? Email me so we can discuss the details.

Thanks for reading and caring about children!

-Robin

Link to Amazon

Find out what the students, parents, and staff at

Blackstone Academy are up to in

UNKNOWN THREAT, an entertaining Mystery/Thriller novel.

Available at Amazon

The Bully And The Hero

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

Robin Lyons' Blog Post #113Hello. Thank you for continuing to read my research. I believe it’s important for people to understand that danger lurks at most schools.

You might be surprised by this post as I’m spotlighting the hero rather than the villain.

BLOG POST #113: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific criminal case involving a high school bully, a visually impaired classmate, and a hero.

The Law Is The Law, Right?

Or is the law subjective? Where I live, there’s a case in the mainstream news about a person who threw a cream pie into the face of a mayor. Was it assault? The jury couldn’t reach a verdict. What if it had been acid thrown in the face instead of pie?

In the bullying case referenced in this post, a bully was punching a visually impaired boy at school. Fighting was a clear violation of the school district’s administrative regulation on conduct.

To display proper conduct to and from school, on school grounds and school buses. Specific prohibitions listed in the State Education Code include:

(a) Caused, attempted to cause, or threatened to cause physical injury to another person.

Would you say there should have been consequences for the bully? Perhaps a suspension or an expulsion would have been appropriate.

Would your opinion be different if you knew the hostility between the bully and the disabled boy was mutual and had been building for some time? Did it make the crime worse because of the one boy’s disability?

An Eye For An Eye (pun not intended)

Another boy happened upon the fight scene which was being recorded by many. Nobody had attempted to stop the fight.

With one hard punch, the newcomer to the fight scene knocked the bully to the ground. As he stood over the bully, he was heard saying, “You trying to jump a f—— blind kid, bro. What the f— is your problem?”

His peers quickly hailed the boy a hero on social media. (The same peers who did nothing to stop the fight)

Should the hero’s actions have warranted a consequence? After all, he technically used violence to stop the violent outbreak.

The Law Is The Law: Consequences Can Be Subjective

The bully was arrested and charged with misdemeanor battery.

For confidentiality reasons, the school didn’t release information regarding consequences for the bully. And due to the boy’s age, it’s unknown if the battery charge was dismissed or not.

Rumors circulated about the hero being suspended from school and kicked off the football team.

Through a public statement and because the boy’s parents granted permission, the school district quashed the rumors. They had not suspended the hero for coming to the aid of his classmate. And he wasn’t on the football team that school year.

The hero had his moment of fame and went back to being a teenager who did the right thing.

Why don’t more kids do the right thing?

What do you think about this case? Do you know of a school crime you’d like to share? Email me so we can discuss the details.

Thanks for reading!

-Robin

Link to Amazon

Find out what the students, parents, and staff at

Blackstone Academy are up to in

UNKNOWN THREAT, an entertaining Mystery/Thriller novel.

Available at Amazon

A Plan To Murder Bullies

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

Robin Lyons' Blog Post #110Whether it’s a case of school violence or about bullying, the two crimes are often connected. When bullying goes unreported it becomes he said/she said and too often the victim becomes the criminal.

In my opinion, parents and grandparents should continuously talk about bullying with children and stress it’s okay to speak up, in fact, it’s imperative.

BLOG POST #110: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific criminal case involving two high school boys and their plan to kill.

Two boys, a 14 and a 15-year-old made a plan to kill faculty and students at their high school.

Loose Lips Foil Plans

Thankfully, kids talk. The two boys had to have said something to someone who took their intentions seriously and told the school administration. The school administration detained the two boys and searched their backpacks.

Found in the backpacks were detailed plans and evidence showing the two had conducted surveillance of specific staff members to know where they would be at the time of the event.

Vigilance Required In The Lunchroom

Both boys’ homes were searched. The boys had gathered fireworks, gunpowder, and fuses to make pipe bombs. They had planned to hide a duffel bag at the school filled with guns, ammo, bombs, gas masks, and chloride gas to be readily available. The attack was to take place during lunch time.

It was a plan of revenge for being bullied by staff members and classmates.

From my research, attacks are often planned to take place at lunch. It’s my assumption the targeted kids are expected to be together at that time. Whereas at any other time of the school day, the kids would be in classes.

Upon entering the lunch hall, the first victim would have been the resource officer (campus security). The principal was on the list as well. Knowing the school would go into lockdown mode, they planned to bring an ax to bust into locked classrooms.

Formative Years Lost

While being transported to the law enforcement center, the older boy told an officer he was glad they were stopped before anything happened.

Both teens pleaded no contest to the charge of conspiracy to commit capital murder. No contest in juvenile court is the same as guilty in adult court.

At the sentencing hearing, the principal asked for a “very severe penalty,” contending the teen’s actions “created fear, anxiety, and disruptions for thousands of students and staff.”

The judge sentenced both boys to serve three years and nine months in juvenile custody, followed by three years of aftercare.

If you found this case interesting, you’ll also want to read, Planned Attack at the Middle School, where a 12-year-old had a similar plan.

What do you think about this case? Do you know of a school crime you’d like to share? Email me so we can discuss the details.

 

Thanks for reading!

-Robin

Link to Amazon

Find out what the students, parents, and staff at

Blackstone Academy are up to in

UNKNOWN THREAT

an entertaining Mystery/Thriller novel.

Available at Amazon

Don’t Accept Candy From A Bully

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

 

Robin Lyons' Blog Post #107When researching cases, I often reflect on situations my adult children experienced when they were in school and what my grandchildren see nowadays. Sadly, they’ve all crossed paths with a bully.

When it comes to bullying, there are too many cases. Parents are in denial. Schools are overworked and underfunded. Law enforcement has bigger fish to fry.

I’m certain if I asked each of you reading this post to share a bully incident; you’d ALL have a story to tell.

Thank you for reading and for caring about children.

BLOG POST #107: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific criminal case involving two middle school bullies.

Students bullying students begins as early as kindergarten

Kids who bully, start school as bullies, they gain intensity and momentum as they progress through the grades.

We’ve all heard and understand the act of bullying is more about the bully than the victim. It’s about the bully’s low self-esteem, low self-worth, or it’s learned from their dysfunctional home life. That fact doesn’t make it any easier for the victim.

Some schools do bully awareness training for students. I’m all for it! I’ve seen role play training teach students how to respond to bullying. When a victim challenges a bully, the bully typically moves on to bully someone else. Training helps kids learn how to stand up to bullies.

Middle School Sports: Who’s Watching the Spectators?

The middle school girls’ basketball team was warming up for their game. Kids like to hang out after school with friends. A sporting event provides the perfect excuse to hang out.

On this day, at this middle school, one of the students hanging out had mental disabilities. His ‘friends’ knew he was an easy mark.

A Bully Offering A Gift Is Bad News

The two bullies wiped a urinal with a candy Push Pop. Then they gave it to the boy with disabilities and encouraged him to lick it, which he did. After he had licked the candy, they told him what they had done with it.

Security cameras recorded the incident. The bullies also punched and kicked the boy. All three boys were 14 at the time.

“I think what hurts me more than anything is they did it in front of 30 of his peers and that nobody felt the need to go and tell somebody,” said the victim’s mother.

Law enforcement filed misdemeanor charges of assault and violating the Safe Schools Act against the two bullies.

Safe School Act Full Text

The defense attorney said regarding her clients’ actions, “I would categorize this incident as an incident of youthful indiscretion…. I hate to use the phrase ‘kids will be kids,’ but I think that is what happened in this instance.”

With security video evidence, the boys admitted in court to the two charges.

Two Peas In A Pod

This incident happened in early spring. The school suspended both boys for the remainder of the school year.

The judge disagreed with the boys’ attorney. He said, “You’re supposed to be on your best behavior in school. So if this is an example of your best behavior, I wonder what your worst behavior is.”

Both boys received the same sentence. And both will be under court supervision in addition to:

  1. No contact with the victim.
  2. Serve 25 hours of community service helping people with special needs.
  3. Write apology letters to the victim and school.
  4. Participate and cooperate in counseling.
  5. Pay court costs of just over $100.00.

If either boy fails to comply or is in trouble with the law again, they will serve five days in a juvenile detention center.

What do you think about this case? Do you know of a school crime you’d like to share? Email me so we can discuss the details.

Thanks for reading!

-Robin

Link to Amazon

Find out what the students, parents, and staff at

Blackstone Academy are up to in UNKNOWN THREAT,

an entertaining Mystery/Thriller novel.

Available at Amazon

School Violence: How Do We Make It Stop?

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

Robin Lyons' Blog Post #106One of the saddest experiences I’ve had in life was to attend a candlelight vigil at my hometown elementary school after the beloved principal was gunned down in his office.

There seem to be a few commonalities between school shootings. Retaliation for bullying is high on the list. A gang war isn’t a surprise. The love triangle is shocking.

BLOG POST #106: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific criminal case involving a high school shooting.

Children are a large part of the problem and need to be  involved in the solution.

How Does a Bully Choose a Victim?

Quantifying bullying is hard. One person can respond to criticism and ridicule with a shrug of their shoulders. Another person may retreat, be fearful and become depressed.

Being a kid is tough. When you add low self-esteem, low self-worth, body image, difficult home life, or any of the myriad of challenging scenarios children must overcome, and you have a prime candidate for bullying.

Females respond to bullying differently than males because the male ego is in play. And it seems boys during the years when hormones are raging are the most volatile.

Nothing, absolutely nothing justifies responding to any event with violence.

How Not to Respond to Bullying

The 15-year-old boy had been attending the high school for one year. His relative said he’d mentioned he was being bullied. They didn’t realize it was as bad as it must have been. Another relative was unaware the young boy had searched her home and found a gun.

Upon arriving at school, the 15-year-old and the other boy, the one he claimed was a bully, met near the entrance of the school. It was a normal day for the other students until two shots rang out.

The 15-year-old shooter dropped the gun and turned himself in to the principal to await law enforcement.

The alleged bully was shot twice and taken to a hospital where he spent two months in intensive care.

The community, staff, parents, and classmates held a candlelight vigil at the school. Getting together after a tragedy is both heartbreaking and healing.

Schools Cannot Stop School Violence

The authorities arrested the shooter and charged him with assault with a deadly weapon. His case was transferred from juvenile court to adult court. The 15-year-old was sentenced to 6 years and 10 months in state prison.

During the investigation, it became known the shooter had been charged with stabbing another student at the previous high school. This made me wonder if bullying was at the core of the conflict or did the shooter have violent tendencies.

Teachers teach. Principals make sure schools run efficiently, stay within a budget, and monitor student achievement. Most schools don’t have marshals or resource officers to police the campuses. The staff whose job it is to ‘monitor’ students is often a woman or older person supplementing a retirement. There are also custodians, librarians, computer techs, classroom aides, cafeteria workers, bus drivers, etc. At most schools, nobody is trained to be aware of building tension between students, nor are they trained to derail an altercation or anticipate looming violence.

I believe students are one of the keys to ending school violence. When community leaders, law enforcement, school administration, and parents get together to brainstorm methods to end school violence they seldom include students. In my opinion, if children aren’t part of the solution, the solution will fail.

I was chatting with someone in the United Kingdom the other day; he mentioned a school massacre that happened there in 1996. Sixteen children and one adult were killed that day. In response to this shooting, tighter private ownership gun restrictions were enacted. They haven’t had a school massacre since.

Is tighter gun control the answer? One thing is certain; people are passionate about their opinions on both sides of this debate.

What do you think about this case? Do you know of a school crime you’d like to share? Email me so we can discuss the details.

 

Thanks for reading!

-Robin

Find out what the students, parents, and staff at

Blackstone Academy are up to in

Link to AmazonUNKNOWN THREAT

an entertaining Mystery/Thriller novel.

Available at Amazon