The School Teacher Who Couldn’t Cope

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

Robin Lyons' blog post #125As you read this, it’s likely your children, grandchild, nieces, or nephews may be back in school. It’s hard to keep up with the varying school start/stop dates across the US.

My grandchildren are back in school. And I’m back on the lookout for anyone suspicious who’s lurking near, working at, or attending schools, hopefully, you are too.

BLOG POST #125: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific criminal case involving a high school teacher.

Monday Morning Dread

It was Monday morning when a local 911 call center received a call from someone who said there would be a shooting and explosion at three area schools. Law enforcement was dispatched to the schools. All three were evacuated and searched finding nothing suspicious.

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Should School Teachers Be Drug-Tested?

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

Robin Lyons' Blog Post #120Why aren’t school teachers drug tested? I don’t know of any school districts requiring teachers to pass a drug test, before or during their employment. If you know of one, please email me with the district name and location.

Schools typically require safety-sensitive positions, such as a bus driver, to pass a pre-employment drug test. And more often than not bus drivers are also required to undergo periodic and random drug and alcohol testing.

BLOG POST #120: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific criminal case involving a 27-year-old second-grade school teacher with a drug problem.

A Classic Case

Too often a person prescribed pain medication for an injury of some sort becomes a drug addict. Their physician stops treatment, but the addiction remains. And then they turn to illegal drugs to self-medicate.

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This Teacher Received A Lucrative Income From Her ‘Pretend’ Grocery Store Business

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

Robin Lyons' Blog Post #116Hello! It may not seem like it, but I have high regard for school teachers. Just spending all day ‘on stage’ sounds exhausting. And then they teach to different intelligent levels, different learning abilities, different discipline and support levels. Everything is uncontrollable factors influencing the outcome.

It takes a special person to be a teacher. The pay is relatively low, and the reward is short lived as the students move on to the next grade, and the task begins anew.

When a teacher crosses the line, it’s always surprising and disappointing. It makes me think that person should never have been a teacher in the first place. I believe administrators choose to ignore warning signs or in this case clues of wealth.

BLOG POST #116: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific criminal case involving an elementary school teacher.

You Won’t Get Rich On A Teacher’s Salary

The teacher was one of sixteen people who participated in a scheme to defraud the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (Food Stamps and WIC – Women, Infant, and Children).

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Nobody Suspected the School Principal was Living a Double Life

double-life-fbBLOG POST #86: This week I’m sharing my research on a 33-year-old elementary school principal who had a side business of selling drugs.

The month-and-a-half long investigation began with an anonymous tip about the former school principal’s brother. A search of the brother’s home found heroin and methamphetamine. From that drug bust, law enforcement learned of the former school principal’s involvement.

Law enforcement conducted a search at the home he shared with his wife and young son. They seized enough heroin to make more than 800 capsules. Methadone was also found. Nothing indicated he sold drugs to school students or staff.

He pleaded guilty to one count of possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute and received a 10-year prison sentence beginning with a 120-day treatment program. With time served in jail, the county prosecutor estimated he would serve 8-to-9 months. He will have a permanent conviction on his record which should prevent him from working with children.

Worth mentioning: The month before the bust, the school principal submitted his resignation. It was unclear if he knew of the pending bust or if he had secured a position in a different school district.

Two months before the bust, the school principal threw his hat in the ring for a vacant city official position in the upcoming election. He said he wanted to see someone in the post that would ensure needs are heard and met. On his candidate platform he stated his responsibilities at the elementary school would have remained a priority, but his goals as an elected official would have included connecting with the community and representing his constituents to the fullest of his ability.

What are your thoughts on this case? Do you think the sentenced was just? Do you know of a school crime that you feel others should know about? Send me an email and we can discuss the details.

Thanks for reading!

-Robin

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