Wounded But Not Broken

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

Friday, April 20, 2018, will be 19 years since the mass school shooting at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado.

On that day, twelve students and one teacher were fatally wounded. Twenty students and one teacher were physically wounded and survived. Three more students were wounded while fleeing and also survived.

BLOG POST #154: This week, I’m sharing research on wounded but not broken, survivors of the Columbine High School Massacre.

The entire student body, staff, families, and the community all experienced a horrific event that day. Many continue to suffer from post-traumatic stress. Some people heal publicly—others heal privately.

It was lunchtime at the school. And it was a lovely April day in Colorado. Kids were outside on the lawn, inside the cafeteria, in the library… and then…

Twenty-One Wounded

Teacher, age 35. Hit by broken glass and shrapnel in the shoulder. Finished the school year and began the next school year. Unable to continue, she took a leave of absence. She no longer works at Columbine High School.

Student, age 18. Shot in the knee, shoulder, and foot. Maintains a low profile.

Student, age 18. Shot in the shoulder, hand, arms, and thigh. Maintains a low profile.

Student, age 18. Shot in the chest, arms, and abdomen. Friend next her was killed. Maintains a low profile.

Student, age 18. Shot in the knee. Went on to attend college, work in carpentry, and moved from Colorado.

Student, age 17. Shot in the shoulder, hand, and neck requiring tissue replacement. Became a registered nurse for a period. Now a public speaker. Married with four children.

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Stop The Madness

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events

can be upsetting.

I’m still deeply saddened by the school massacre that happened in Florida recently. My heart aches for the families and friends who lost a loved one.

Typically, I share case research after the sentencing phase has concluded. However, in this post, I chose to share some recent news that is both disturbing and praiseworthy.

BLOG POST #148: This week, I’m sharing information on specific criminal cases involving foiled school shooting plots.

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Don’t Like Mondays

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

With every school shooting, you can expect long lasting heartache. And the tentacles of pain can be far reaching, beyond the families directly affected by the cruel act.

BLOG POST #143: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific criminal case involving a 16-year-old female.

Not Your Typical California Day

On what appeared to be a typical California day in January, shots rang out as an elementary school principal was opening the gates to the school.

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These Teens Learned A Hard Lesson

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

Greetings from Northern California,

In addition to working on the next book in the School Marshal Series, Unknown Alliance, I’m planning a few mini stories to provide insight to traumatic moments in the lives of Maggie, Jason, and Marlene. Those eBooks will be exclusively available to club members.

Now on to this week’s news…

BLOG POST #136: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific criminal case involving teenage boys making threats on social media.

Hurtful Online Comments

A high school girl posted insulting comments on social media against a local 18-year-old boy. He retaliated with a barrage of threatening posts aimed at the girl.

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Breaking Up Can Be Deadly

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

Robin Lyons' Blog Post #131When you’re in high school, being popular doesn’t necessarily make life easier. It can be just as difficult as being the lowest kid in the pecking order.

Like everyone, popular kids have the negative voice in their head telling them they’re fat or worthless, etc. Popular kids can come from turbulent homes.

BLOG POST #131: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific criminal case involving a popular high school student.

You’d think the popular football player, recently crowned Homecoming Prince, would be on top of the world. Instead, like so many teenagers, he kept his troubles inside.

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