Don’t Like Mondays

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Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

With every school shooting, you can expect long lasting heartache. And the tentacles of pain can be far reaching, beyond the families directly affected by the cruel act.

BLOG POST #143: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific criminal case involving a 16-year-old female.

Not Your Typical California Day

On what appeared to be a typical California day in January, shots rang out as an elementary school principal was opening the gates to the school.

A 16-year-old girl used a 22 long rifle with little to no recoil, a Christmas gift from her father, to shoot toward the elementary school from her home across the street.

Infamous Intention

A few days before the shooting she had told another teen something big was going to happen on Monday, it would be on TV and radio.

Monday morning she told her father she didn’t feel well. He went to work and she stayed home.

The school principal attempted to rush children away from the gunshots when he was hit and killed. A school custodian ran to help the principal when he too was shot and killed. Eight children and a police officer sustained nonlife-threatening injuries.

A Standoff Ensued

A quick-thinking police officer risked his life to drive a trash truck in front of the teen’s home to block her field of fire.

She barricaded herself inside her home.

During the standoff, while on the phone with negotiators, she was asked why she had committed the shootings to which she indicated, “for the fun of it” and “I don’t like Mondays.” She also had said, she had no reason for it, and in regards to the children, “it was just like shooting ducks in a pond.”

After a seven-hour standoff, she laid her gun down and surrendered.

The Aftermath

Test results showed there were no drugs or alcohol found in her system the day of the shooting.

The court charged her as an adult. She pleaded guilty to two counts of murder and assault with a deadly weapon. Thirty-eight years ago she was sentenced to 25 years to life.

Life After 25 Years

She’s been before the parole board four times but remains incarcerated. As to why she committed the shooting, she now states, at the time, she no longer wanted to live and hoped for death by cop. She knew if she shot at a school the police would show up and shoot her. Her next parole hearing will be in 2019.

Were there warning signs? You decide. Her parents divorced when she was young, and custody was awarded to her father. Because of truancy, she had been transferred to a facility for troubled youths. The facility informed her parents she was suicidal. She had a prior arrest for using a bb gun to shoot out windows at the elementary school and for burglary. The month before the deadly shooting she was given a psychiatric evaluation. It was recommended she be admitted to a mental hospital for depression, but her father didn’t give permission.

Worth mentioning: Due to declining enrollment, the school was closed four years after the shooting. The teen’s father continues to reside in the house across the street from the school.

If you’re interested, here’s a documentary on the event.

I Don’t Like Mondays

What do you think about this case? Join the conversation on the website. We talk about the sensitive subject of crimes occurring at or connected to schools. Your relevant comments are always welcome on the Research Blog.

Do you know of a school crime you’d like to share? Email me so we can discuss the details.

Thanks for reading!

-Robin

Link to Amazon

Find out what Mac MacKenna is up to in

UNKNOWN THREAT and MAC

Both Available at Amazon

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These Teens Learned A Hard Lesson

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Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

Greetings from Northern California,

In addition to working on the next book in the School Marshal Series, Unknown Alliance, I’m planning a few mini stories to provide insight to traumatic moments in the lives of Maggie, Jason, and Marlene. Those eBooks will be exclusively available to club members.

Now on to this week’s news…

BLOG POST #136: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific criminal case involving teenage boys making threats on social media.

Hurtful Online Comments

A high school girl posted insulting comments on social media against a local 18-year-old boy. He retaliated with a barrage of threatening posts aimed at the girl.

Follow The Leader

Then the boy enlisted two 15-year-old friends to join him in his virtual feud. One of the younger boys [in messages] told the girl he was going to rape her and make her boyfriend watch. The boys threatened her with physical violence which included shooting her and others.

The boys may have received a strong warning had they not turned up the heat on the virtual assault when they posted a school shooting would happen at 1:00 pm on a specific day.

Online Posts Are Evidence Of Wrongdoing

The girl went to the police and showed them the messages.

All three boys were arrested. Two were charged with conspiracy to commit first-degree premeditated murder. All three were facing terrorism-related charges.

Plea Agreements

The oldest teen pleaded guilty to one count of false report or threat of terrorism and agreed to testify against one of the younger boys. He told the judge, “It was not serious, it was childish.” After serving close to one year in county jail, he was sentenced to five months of probation.

One of the younger boys pleaded no contest to reduced charges of attempted false report of terror and was released on a $200,000 cash bond with restrictions to await sentencing. He was to stay at the home of his parents, no cell phone use, no computer use and no contact with victims.

The other 15-year-old’s case was moved to juvenile court where the proceedings are confidential.

Don’t Cross The Judge

The judge canceled the bond and sent the younger boy straight to county jail for three weeks when he learned the boy had excessive absences and tardiness from school, had been caught with a cellphone his parents provided and was active on social media.

At sentencing, the judge showed compassion and told the young boy’s tearful parents, “Prison is life-changing. If he goes to prison, he’ll be beaten, stabbed and raped.”

He further admonished the parents and told them they were enabling their son and doing him no good. And then the judge sentenced their son to one year in the county jail with 340 days credited and five years of probation.

Worth Mentioning: During the time this case made its way through the court system the oldest teen was arrested on unrelated sexual charges. More on that next week.

Here’s my ‘Take Away’ in this case: It’s a recipe for disaster when parents allow their children to be in control. Nobody has ever said parenting was easy. As the judge said, in this case, enabling children does them no good. Sure they’ll stomp their feet, have a tantrum, say hurtful things, and then they’ll accept their parent decision. Stay strong; your children will thank you when they’re an adult.

What do you think about this case? Join the conversation on the website. We talk about the sensitive subject of crimes occurring at or connected to schools. Your relevant comments are always welcome on the Research Blog.

Do you know of a school crime you’d like to share? Email me so we can discuss the details.

Thanks for reading!

-Robin

Link to Amazon

Find out what Mac MacKenna  is up to in

UNKNOWN THREAT and MAC

Both Available at Amazon

MAC is FREE when you join the School News Reader Club

Breaking Up Can Be Deadly

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

Robin Lyons' Blog Post #131When you’re in high school, being popular doesn’t necessarily make life easier. It can be just as difficult as being the lowest kid in the pecking order.

Like everyone, popular kids have the negative voice in their head telling them they’re fat or worthless, etc. Popular kids can come from turbulent homes.

BLOG POST #131: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific criminal case involving a popular high school student.

You’d think the popular football player, recently crowned Homecoming Prince, would be on top of the world. Instead, like so many teenagers, he kept his troubles inside.

Kids Will Be Kids – Right?

His parents didn’t understand the depth of their son’s depression. They knew he and his longtime girlfriend had broken up after Homecoming. And they knew he’d gotten into an altercation with another football player and was suspended for a few days.

Before school, his pleading texts to his ex-girlfriend went unanswered.

Not A Normal Day

To his mother, it was a normal day when she dropped her son off at school the same as she had done every day.

She didn’t know the day was far from normal. She had no clue her son had taken his father’s guns and ammunition with him that day.

Keep Your Friends Close

He asked friends to meet him in the cafeteria for first lunch. The friends joined him at a lunch table.

When he texted a photo of a gun to his ex-girlfriend, she called him, and they talked briefly.

And Then He Snapped

After the phone call with his ex-girlfriend, he bolted from his seat and shot his friends one by one—five friends.

He reloaded, and then shot himself.

Including the shooter, four kids died that day, and two were critically wounded.

Minutes before shooting anyone, he had texted a group of family members and apologized to the families of his victims. He said he needed to take his crew with him; he didn’t want to go alone.

Here’s my ‘Take Away’ on this case: Case after case, I read about parents who never thought their child would do what they did. And I’m not implying this tragedy wouldn’t have happened had the boy’s parents paid more attention to their son’s depression. At some point parents need to consider if their child is “down” about something they very well may be capable of suicide or murder-suicide.

What do you think about this case? Join the conversation on the website. We talk about the sensitive subject of crimes occurring at or connected to schools. Your relevant comments are always welcome on the Research Blog.

Do you know of a school crime you’d like to share? Email me so we can discuss the details.

Thanks for reading!

-Robin

Link to AmazonFind out what Mac MacKenna is up to in

UNKNOWN THREAT and MAC

Both Available at Amazon

MAC is FREE when you join the School News Reader Club

The Tragic Death Of A Caring Educator

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

Robin Lyons' Blog Post #129Sadly, there was another school shooting this week. My thoughts and prayers go out to all who lost their loved one, to those injured, and to those who were frightened by the event.

Perpetrators of school shootings act for a broad range of reasons. And it isn’t always a student looking down the barrel of a gun.

BLOG POST #129: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific case involving a special needs teacher and her estranged husband.

Not Happily Ever After

The teacher and her husband dated for four years before they married. He was a pastor with a criminal history. She was known as a caring educator with a special affinity for working with children with learning disabilities.

The teacher’s mother was reported to have said her son-in-law changed after the two married. He began criticizing and belittling her daughter.

Three months after they wed, the teacher moved out.

Trouble Found Her At Work

A few weeks after the teacher moved out, her estranged husband walked into the school and used the pretense of dropping off something for his wife. He entered her elementary classroom, with 15 sets of little eyes watching, he shot and killed his wife before taking his own life. Gunfire also hit two students; one was fatally wounded.

The Rest Of The Story

To aid in the recovery from the horrific event, over the summer, the school received a $1 million makeover.

As parents arrived on the first day of school, they noticed a slowdown when entering the building. New security measures were in place at the entrance. Upon entering the school, they saw the hallways had been repainted with bright colors and featured inspirational quotes.

Memories of our lives, of our work and our deeds will continue in others.” – Rosa Parks

Tempered glass now lined the large windows in the interior classrooms. Classrooms now have locking steel doors and an exterior exit. The special needs classroom where the deadly shooting took place is now a project room, and the number on the door was changed. The special needs students have a new classroom across the hall.

Returning to a campus after an act of violence has occurred is extremely difficult. I applaud the school district for their effort to make the school as welcoming and positive as possible.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship, here’s some helpful information: Domestic Violence & Abuse

Worth mentioning: The Center for Relationship Abuse Awareness reports 75% of domestic violence related homicides occur upon separation.

Here’s my ‘Take Away’: Schools can’t be expected to do background checks on coworkers’ spouses. Domestic violence is tricky, the person being abused is often afraid to say anything for fear the abuse will intensify or worse. There are always a few friends who know or strongly suspect what’s happening. Does the spouse excessively boast about how wonderful life is? That’s a clue; life may be far from wonderful. Whenever your gut tells you something is off, speak to the principal so he or she can know to be leery of the spouse.

What do you think about this case? Join the conversation on the website. We talk about the sensitive subject of crimes occurring at or connected to schools. Your relevant comments are always welcome on the Research Blog.

Do you know of a school crime you’d like to share? Email me so we can discuss the details.

Thanks for reading and caring about children!

-Robin

Link to Amazon

Find out what Mac MacKenna is up to in

UNKNOWN THREAT and MAC

Both Available at Amazon

MAC is FREE when you join the School News Reader Club

Alumni Shooter at the Middle School

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

Schools have safety policies, they perform drills to prepare for possible shooter scenarios, and they have put in place best practices. I’d venture a guess that most if not all schools now require visitors to ‘sign-in’ at the office and be issued a temporary visitor badge.

Sadly, there is no way to prepare for the school shooting in the case I’m sharing research on in the post.

BLOG POST #127: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific school shooting case involving a former middle school student.

Old Stomping Ground

On the day of the shooting, he first went to a sporting goods store to purchase ammunition for the high powered rifle he’d borrowed from his father without his father’s knowledge and had placed in the trunk of his car. Then he stopped for a fast food lunch before arriving at the middle school he attended twenty years ago.

Upon entering the middle school, he was advised by a custodian that he needed to go to the office. In the office, he told the secretary he wanted to see the new wing of the building and asked about certain teachers he had known. He signed in to receive a visitor’s badge and waited for school to let out.

The Inquiry

He asked a custodian if he’d gone to school there, the custodian responded that he had not.

He went outside and asked a group of students whether they attended the school. They answered that they did not.

No Turning Back

Returning to his car, he retrieved the rifle. By this time, the school had released, he approached another group of students and asked if they went to the middle school and one of them answered yes. He announced they were all going to die and fired a shot, hitting one 8th-grade student. And then reloaded and shot another 8th-grade student. Both students survived.

A Heroic Act

A fearless teacher raced to the gunman and tackled him to the ground. He and other employees held the shooter on the ground until law enforcement arrived.

Hard Life

Unemployed and struggling financially the shooter had been living with his father the previous five years. And no stranger to trouble, over the years the shooter had been charged with suspicion of menacing, assault, domestic violence, and driving under the influence.

The school shooter was charged with four counts of attempted murder, four counts of first-degree assault, two counts of child abuse resulting in serious bodily injury, and unlawful possession of a weapon on school grounds.

Happy Defense

He pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity.

Diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, he was found not guilty by reason of insanity on ten of eleven counts but guilty of unlawful possession of a weapon on school grounds.

The crime took place in one of 11 states that require prosecutors to prove a defendant was sane at the time of the crime rather than require the defense to prove insanity.

The judge sentenced him to 18 months in prison and indefinitely to a state mental hospital until doctors convince the judge that he is no longer a threat.

Worth mentioning: Five years after the middle school shooting, the court allowed the shooter limited, supervised outings twice a week to stress-free public places as the next step in his therapy at the state mental hospital. As you can imagine, the victims and their families were not happy about the decision.

Here’s my ‘Take Away’ 0n this case: This case is troubling because the father was the only person who may have seen his son’s behavior and concluded there might be a dangerous outcome. Parents can’t imagine their child would do something this horrible. And typically, parents stand by their child and say what they did was uncharacteristic behavior. Possibly schools need to tighten their best practices even more. Is it time to deny access to all who aren’t students or staff?

What do you think about this case? Join the conversation on the website. We talk about the sensitive subject of crimes occurring at or connected to schools. Your relevant comments are always welcome on the Research Blog.

Do you know of a school crime you’d like to share? Email me so we can discuss the details.

Thanks for reading and caring about children!

-Robin

Link to Amazon

Find out what Mac MacKenna  is up to in

UNKNOWN THREAT and MAC

Both Available at Amazon

MAC is FREE when you join the School News Reader Club