Sexting In The 2018 School Year

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

The headlines used in the graphic for this post are real headlines from 2018. There are plenty more just like them—Google ‘Sexting.’

Schools in your area are back in session or will be soon. This is the perfect time to share some sensitive but important information regarding texting or more specifically, sexting.

When a parent is asked if their teenager is sexting, most if not all would respond, “Not my son/daughter.” Yet sexting is on the rise faster than the stock market in an up period.

BLOG POST #158: This week, I’m sharing research on a sexting, primarily among teenagers.

There are apps and programs parents can and should use to monitor their child’s internet usage.

Many kids use their phones to access social media platforms such as SnapChat and Instagram to communicate but they tend to forget or don’t understand they’re using the internet.

Teens also don’t seem to understand texting is also using the internet. Texts don’t go directly from one cell phone to another. Texts are stored at whatever service provider is used and then transferred to the recipient. It happens so fast it seems to go directly from one person to another.

A lesser form of sexting is using emojis in texting conversations. Kids love to use emojis. Heck, I love to use emojis. Below I’ve included some emojis with hidden meaning to teens. Here’s a great article with more emojis and information: Parent Translation Series Part One. Parents in the know are better equipped to protect their children from sexting, cyber-bullying, and cyber predators.

Typically kids who exchange texts about sexually explicit stuff are entering the hormone charged phase of curiosity and could be talked into sending a nude or semi-nude photo.

Here’s the problem: When teens sext each other nude photos it’s child pornography and punishable by law. It doesn’t matter if the exchange is teen-to-teen.

Here are some sexual emojis to be on the lookout for, especially when used in an odd context.

Parents shouldn’t be afraid to check their child’s cell phone or have open discussions about sexting with their teenagers. It may keep them from being arrested and charged with possession of child pornography.

Here’s another great post about How To Talk About Sexting With Teenagers.

What are your thoughts about sexting? Join the conversation on the website. We talk about the sensitive subject of crimes occurring at or connected to schools. Your relevant comments are always welcome on the Research Blog.

Do you know of a school crime you’d like to share? Email me so we can discuss the details.

Thanks for reading!

-Robin

All School Marshal Novels are available at Amazon US and Amazon UK and MAC is FREE when you join Robin’s Reader Club

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