School Principal Blinded By Love

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime and/or events can be upsetting.

For additional funding and to comply with the Safe and Drug-Free Schools Community Act (SDFSCA), schools in the US have adopted drug and violence prevention programs for students, teachers, staff, and parent education. Programs vary from school to school.

If staff alcohol and/or drug related issues occur, the school district would also utilize employment contracts, school board policies, and bargaining unit contracts to take appropriate action.

BLOG POST #157: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific criminal case involving a school principal.

The School Principal

Her crime occurred on her own time. However, her actions might make you question her character while on duty. Generally speaking, school employees—similarly to law enforcement and emergency response personnel—should set an example of high moral standards both on and off duty.

She’d broken the stigma often related to teen mothers who drop out of high school and earned two master’s degrees. At the time of her crime, she’d been with the school district for 18-years.

She was considered an up-and-coming leader in the community.

The Momma

As a mother, I’d go to great lengths to help my children. I imagine most mothers would do the same.

Her adult son was in a maximum security prison on weapons charges. According to the principal, her son needed money to pay off a debt (it’s assumed the debt was to someone also in prison).

The principal, her boyfriend and her 10-year-old daughter were detained upon arrival at the prison for a visitation. She and her boyfriend had in their possession heroin and other narcotics attempting to smuggle the drugs to the son.

The Law

She was arrested. Pending the outcome of her case, the school district immediately transferred her to a position away from the school where she’d been the principal.

Originally charged with drug possession, taking contraband into a prison, and endangering the welfare of a child, thirty-three months later, she pleaded guilty to introducing contraband into a prison, a misdemeanor and was sentenced to three years’ probation.

The school district terminated her employment once she pleaded guilty to the drug charge. She had remained on the school district payroll for the entire 33-months.

What are your thoughts about this case? Join the conversation on the website. We talk about the sensitive subject of crimes occurring at or connected to schools. Your relevant comments are always welcome on the Research Blog.

Do you know of a school crime you’d like to share? Email me so we can discuss the details.

Thanks for reading!

-Robin

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