Truth or Dare: A School Threat

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime, and/or events can be upsetting.

Robin Lyons Blog

BLOG POST #204: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific crime involving a school threat.

Has your child’s school gone into lock-down mode because of a threat made against their school?

More and more, you hear about arrests for making threats. Kids make bold statements on social media. Other kids who’ve seen a threat are starting to become whistleblowers and it’s making a difference.

In the eyes of the law, it doesn’t matter if the threat is credible, retaliatory or a prank, it’s against the law.

When someone called the middle school and left a message threatening to kill everyone at the school on the first day back after the summer break, the police took the threat very serious.

They did a sweep for explosive devices at the middle school, and they increased the police presence at the school.

Two men suspected to have made the threats were apprehended. The police arrested both men. No evidence was found to substantiate the threat.

Dumb Stunt

It was reported, the two men had been playing ‘truth or dare.’ As a result, one called the school and left a threatening message.

The District Attorney’s office charged one of the men with obstructing a public officer, a misdemeanor.

The man who’d placed the threatening call later pleaded guilty to creating a terrorism hoax, which is a felony. He received a two-year prison sentence for his phone call prank. Upon his release, he’ll have three years of probation.

What are your thoughts about this case? Join the conversation on the website. We talk about the sensitive subject of crimes occurring at or connected to schools.

Do you know of a school crime you’d like to share? Email me so we can discuss the details.

Thanks for reading!

-Robin

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Source: Norman Police Department Press Release, The Norman Transcript, CBS Oklahoma’s Own News 9

Dangerous Predator

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime, and/or events can be upsetting.

Robin Lyons BlogBLOG POST #203: This week, I’m sharing research on a criminal case involving a school district human resources director.

Whether a person works for a school district or elsewhere—if they enjoy seeing children abused sexually, eventually, they’ll get caught and be arrested.

Child pornography is illegal. When it’s a school district employee who’s caught, that makes the crime even more despicable.

The 30-something man had worked for the school district for sixteen years. He began as a school teacher, then an assistant principal, and a middle school principal, but held the position of Human Resources Director at the time of his arrest.

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Fiction Autopsy Reporting

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Posts about real school tragedy, crime, and/or events can be upsetting.

Robin Lyons BlogBLOG POST #202: This week, I’m sharing information about my autopsy reporting research.

For me, research helps me create authentic scenes and scenarios, which then brings the story to life.

When I think about the amount of research that goes into writing a book, it boggles my mind to think people did research with no internet. There was the library, of course, which at the time felt as great as the internet does now, but the information was dated.

With the novel I’m currently working on, Unknown Event, I had to dig into several areas unfamiliar to me, such as murder investigation, weapons, explosives, and autopsy reporting. Spoiler-alert: There will be death in the novel.

I imagine pre-internet, an author might schedule an interview with the local medical examiner or coroner. Maybe even observe an actual autopsy being conducted.

With the internet, you can search for real autopsy reports—they’re out there. I downloaded several for a specific type of death. There are also articles in medical journals about autopsies, and if you really want to nail the autopsy, you can watch videos on Youtube.

I download and read a lot of information even though I only use a fraction. Research can definitely be a time-suck, albeit a necessary task. You also have to pay attention to the source of information, if it’s not from a person in the profession or business or agency dealing with the area of research, I keep looking.

A few of the resources I found helpful were:

  • County of Los Angeles, Department of Medical Examiner-Coroner website had tons of information and downloadable forms.
  • Practical Pathology of Gunshot Wounds an article in the Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine journal.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Medical Examiners’ and Coroners’ Handbook on Death Registration and Fetal Death Reporting.

And still, I might not get something 100% accurate. I have to remind myself—its fiction.

What are your thoughts about this post? Did you enjoy the glimpse into my research? Join the conversation on the website. Your relevant comments are always welcome.

Do you know of a school crime you’d like to share? Email me so we can discuss the details.

Thanks for reading!

-Robin

Have you joined the club? Find out more at:  Reader Club

ROBIN LYONS BLOG

Available wherever you purchase or borrow books.

Where to buy Robin Lyons books

Deadly Solution

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime, and/or events can be upsetting.

Robin Lyons BlogBLOG POST #201: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific crime about a school shooting involving two 16-year-old high school students.

The bullying had escalated to the point where the boy who’d been bullied took a stolen gun he’d acquired to his school that had no metal detectors and at the time, didn’t do bag searches.

He Said

According to the shooter’s statement, the Friday before the shooting, he’d been in an off-campus fight with boys. Over the weekend, there were texts circulating about who had won the fight.

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Bullied To Tears

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime, and/or events can be upsetting.

For my 200th blog post, I’ve chosen the subject of bullying. In my opinion, bullying is the #1 problem in schools today. From all the research I’ve done and my work experience, I’ve come to believe much of the school violence stems from bullying.

It’s hard for parents to see their child come home day-after-day in tears from having been bullied at school or in this case on the bus. With that said. It’s never a good idea to deal with the bully on your own. Talk with the bully’s parents, the school principal, the superintendent, school board members, or perhaps law enforcement if the severity warrants that level of intervention or transfer to a different school.

BLOG POST #200: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific crime involving a school bus invasion.

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