The Boy Who Gave Up

***READER DISCRETION IS ADVISED***

Posts about real school tragedy, crime, and/or events can be upsetting.

Robin Lyons' BlogBLOG POST #195: This week, I’m sharing research on a specific case involving a 13-year-old boy who’d been relentlessly bullied.

Summer is the perfect time to have conversations with your children or grandchildren about bullying. Kids need to understand what to do and what not to do if they are a victim of bullying.

Bullies

It doesn’t take much to hurt a child’s feelings and breakdown their self-esteem. Bullies know this all too well. As a grandmother, when I learn of my grandchildren being bullied, it’s hard not to charge into the school and demand action. Unfortunately, it’s a delicate situation—it shouldn’t be delicate—but politics come into play.

Parents are fearful if they say something, the bullying will get worse. Often times, the bullied child begs the parent not to say anything or keeps the bullying a secret.

What about this scenario: The sports coach, who’s a bully, tells the kids if they have a problem with her/him—don’t run and tattle to their parents—talk to the coach themselves? How’s a child supposed to know what to do in that scenario (true story)?!

It was reported by Danny’s family that after he went to school officials to ask for help, all the boys, including Danny, were gathered in one room to discuss the behavior.

Danny’s mother was quoted to have said kids threw balls at her son in gym class; called him names, and often told him he was weird. He felt humiliated. That type of ridicule and torment wears you down. Kids start to believe it and feel the harassment will never end.

Danny Decision

One of Danny’s sisters found him deceased in the attic. He’d written a final letter and wrote that he’d reached out to school staff but felt they did nothing, his frustration is felt in the suicide letter he left behind. Read for yourself: I Gave Up

Since Danny’s Death

Danny’s Law Legislation is working its way through Congress. The Bill requires an Anti-Bullying Roundtable to be established to study bullying at elementary and secondary schools in the USA. Danny’s Law

Danny’s Angel Network Nurturing Youth (D.A.N.N.Y.) was formed to educate and protect youths against shades of bullying.  Danny’s Angels

Danny’s family has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the Catholic School Danny attended prior to his death. The case has not been settled.

Worth mentioning: Three years after the suicide, both the school principal at the time and the teacher whom the boy felt was helpful are no longer on the staff roster at the school Danny attended.

Must See TV: If you haven’t seen the 2015 documentary, “A Girl Like Her” available free through Amazon Prime Video (if you’re a member), watch it with your kids or by yourself. It’ll give you a glimpse of what unfiltered bullying looks like from the view of a hidden camera. The film will help start the conversation about what not to do.

Here are two great resources for parents: StopBullying.gov

DrugRehab.com/guide/bullying

What are your thoughts about this case? Join the conversation on the website. We talk about the sensitive subject of crimes occurring at or connected to schools. Your relevant comments are always welcome on the Research Blog.

Do you know of a school crime you’d like to share? Email me so we can discuss the details.

Thanks for reading and caring about children!

-Robin

Source:

People.com

Goodhousekeeping.com

NewYorkPost.com

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2 thoughts on “The Boy Who Gave Up

  1. Mark Schultz

    Thank you for sharing this information. I understand very well about what Danny experienced. I was bullied a great deal all through junior and senior high school. I was the second smallest kid in my class and had a terrible stammer.

    • Robin Lyons

      You’re welcome, Mark. And thank you, for sharing your experience. It’s hard for kids to make sense of the reality that the bully is the one who is lacking something which is why they bully. I truly wish schools provided more counseling. In my opinion, bullies need counseling and swift consequences.

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