• Robin Lyons

Scoundrels


Have you ever wondered if anything happens to the people behind the telemarketing scams that call victims claiming to be from a government agency and threaten the victim in order to get money from them? They typically use back taxes owed as the premise of the scheme. If so, then this true-crime case summary is for you.


Co-conspirators called potential victims and claim to be a representative of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS in the USA), Canadian Tax Authorities and other countries’ tax entities. The callers informed the victims they owed back taxes and would soon be arrested and prosecuted for the debt.


A 50-year-old woman, her 44-year-old ex-husband, her 28-year-old son, and a slew of phone solicitors from around the globe were in on the scheme.


To collect and stash the money, they opened bank accounts where the victims would deposit cash. For some, they required wire transfers into the accounts. They also demanded prepaid debit cards and cashier checks. The scoundrels quickly withdrew the deposited money. Victims were also told if they didn’t make payment immediately, their family members would face arrest, prosecution, or other legal consequences. Many believed the ruse and paid.


The IRS Special Agent in Charge said,


“Impersonating the IRS, the Canadian Revenue Agency, or any other financial institutions to attempt to fraudulently collect a debt is deplorable because it shakes the confidence taxpayers have in these institutions.”

The woman pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit bank fraud, wire fraud, and mail fraud rather than go to trial. A federal judge sentenced her to over five years in prison, pay over $600,000 in restitution to the victims, and pay a judgement of over $250,000.


The court sentenced the ex-husband to 10 years and sentenced the son to 10 years and pay over $850,000 in restitution. The son had to agree to the forfeiture of all assets and property subject to forfeiture. #telemarketing #scam #scheme #fraud #truecrime


Be sure to email me if you hear of a true-crime you think would be good in a book. I’ll research it, share it and possibly use it in one of my novels.


And if you are an author interested in this true-crime as inspiration for a plot, email me. I’m happy to share more information about the case.



Source: US Department of Justice, Internal Revenue Service, U.S. District Court

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